It’s A Small World After All

The world is a strange place right now. In the grip of a global pandemic that has the potential to threaten all of our lives.

The best advice is to self isolate, protect yourself, protect those you love and by virtue of sensible action, protect vulnerable strangers. To say a grateful prayer for the nurses, doctors and key workers the world over working with all of their heart and soul to keep us well, keep us safe and help us find a way out to the other side.

To not be one of the idiots clearing supermarket shelves, or taking your entire family out for a day trip in the aisles.

We keep hearing the phrase unprecendented times and though it might be starting to grate, it couldn’t be more true. The world has never faced something of this scale. We’ve survived World Wars, people have lived through nuclear war and terrorist attacks. And yet, we don’t seem to be grasping the sheer importance of staying home. Even in a week when Disney+ was launched, we seem determined to get out and endanger life, simply because we’re being told not to. We cannot be surprised a lockdown has been forced upon us and honestly, the stupidity and selfishness of people at large is starting to scare me more than the virus itself.

My family & I are personally 2 weeks into a suggested 12 week shielding isolation, because both my pregnancy and cerebral palsy apparently place me at a higher risk, so the three of us have bunkered down, basically for the sake of our two children. I don’t think the grade of my cerebral palsy puts me at increased risk because I am fortunate not to have any of the common secondary conditions, like respiratory issues, but we absolutely would rather be safe than sorry.

So there’s no more nursery for Squidge, no playgroups, no gym, no trips to the park. Kev & I are working from home and Netflix & Paw Patrol are babysitting a lot. I feel a lot of guilt, but it’s almost comforting to know we’re not the only ones facing this. I do feel sorry for Squidge most of all, the lack of routine is not fair to her. I will be glad to get that back.

But, I am learning a lot.

There’s not been enough work to work my full days so the childcare has in the most part fallen to me. Kev comes down to play with Squidge and share meals as often as he can. It is so nice to be able to have breakfast together every day and it is certainly something I will want to maintain for our weekends.

It has been so lovely to sit with Squidge and play games, to draw rainbows for the windows, to count all the Stay Safe rainbows out in the community on our daily walks.

I am home a lot anyway given that I worked from home before all this to maintain my health and my world already existed within a small radius of our town, so that I could feel confident and independent. It may not be everyone’s choice when the world is at a normal capacity, but it works for me. Now that the world has been forced to slow down for the greater good, I guess they’re seeing more what my world is like. I mean, I can’t say that everyone appears to be enjoying it, but it’s more of a reality now.

Suddenly, I don’t need to feel so guilty for living in my small world. The whole world is suddenly small. My own personal universe is required to exist within the walls of my home, extending on sunny days out to our backyard, all for the good of ourselves and others.

It’s kinda nice not being able to be frivolous. I mean, I try to be savvy anyway, but there’s nowhere to go right now! I’m not going to lie, I did get a wholesale box of chocolate delivered, so please think of me when I go in for gestastional diabetes test in a few months! It’s nice to have more money in my pocket, so I’m overpaying our mortgage a little more. Like most people, we’re probably being forced to spend more money on our groceries, but that’s pretty much all, but suddenly you learn all the things you already have, the things you can make do without. It no longer makes a difference if I get my hair done every 3 months. In fact, I’m letting it grow out during the isolation so that there’s less work to do when the world goes back to normal. I’m about to be a mum to 2 children, possibly whilst still under all the necessary restrictions of this panemic. My roots are going to be the last damn thing I care about.

Part of me hope that a lot of people out there are reassessing what’s important. This isn’t a lecture, I’m a consumer like the rest of us, but in a time when it’s getting harder by the day to name the positives, it’s nice to know the environment is being given some kind of breather whilst we’re forced to be at home. My home is important, because it is my own and I am lucky to have it. So, whilst it’s possible, the mortgage is important. My nice fluffy blankets are important. My Headspace subscription is important. Clearing the house out ready for the baby is important.

Very few things outside of my little world (besides extended family and the restoration of Squidge’s routine) will continue to be important when some level of sanity and calm is restored in the world. That in itself feels very freeing.

I am almost 20 weeks pregnant now. In some ways, that’s a relief, in other ways it makes me sad. When I dreamt of having a second, I wanted to prioritise myself, my health and enjoy a calm pregnancy. In fact, two of the most pivotal people in my family have had extended hospital stays and now the whole world is at risk from a virus I have to hide from for the sake of them all.

Next week, I will be forced to attend my scan alone, because partners are not permitted to minimise the risk of coronavirus spread and even then, Kev would not be able to attend because we have no support network since Kev’s parents went into isolation for their own health at the same time as us, hence there will be no-one to care for Squidge. There is nothing to be done, but we are both gutted. We wanted to discover our baby’s gender together. Now, however, if it can be determined, I will find out before the father and sister of the baby, the two most important people they will ever know. I have arranged gender reveal surprises for them, but out of necessity rather than anything, because I really dislike the conceit surrounding the tradition of reveals. But I don’t expect anyone to care about the news other than Baby’s family.

My hips are starting to ache a little more and I feel a bit more vulnerable when moving, but I keep remembering the struggle of carrying Squidge and I am thankful most days that my physical self has withstood this pregnancy, especially with all the emotional challenges we have faced instead. I fully intend to single-handedly keep both my physiotherapist and massage therapist in business when my isolation is able to end, because I miss them terribly, as do all my muscles!

I sincerely hope that everyone in a similar position to me is prioritising themselves, taking care of themselves and remembering to breathe. I forget this often and as stress build, my God can I feel it translate in my body. This is an entirely new scenario for us all to live amongst, but remember that that’s true for us all. That means you’re not alone. Keep busy, but take things slow. Much like I wanted my stay-at-home mum lufe to be, there is no sense of time anymore, there is literally no rush. Right now, all we have is time. Use it to look after yourself and make yourself your priority. If we’re not looking after ourselves, we’ll not be able to do our best for others, those who probably need us more than ever whilst the world is on its head.

So let’s go for the little things, the simple pleasures and let the rest fall away. The world will speed up again, it will get big again. Let’s take some comfort in the peace of this small world. It cannot last forever.

Stay safe.

Love Letter to my Little One vol. 3

Oh beautiful girl,

We are going through so much that I forget you are just 3 years old. Times have been tough for you & I, the world has barely stopped for 2 months now and shows no signs of slowing down. Nanny was unexpectedly in hospital and she and Granddad are such a huge part of helping us help you become the amazing young lady you are. It was hard. It was scary. We missed her lots. But Nanny came home for Christmas, we all took a little breath and hoped that her recovery would be kind and that 2020 would allow us to get back to normal.

But the world had other ideas and I’m so sorry for all that has meant for you Squidge. Your daddy, never ill a day in his life it seems, ended up in hospital for 3 long weeks like Nanny and I don’t think the shock has left us yet.

I’ve never had to be without your daddy, not in our 10 years together. I’ve never had to take care of you by myself. I’ve never had to worry about Daddy being poorly, or hospital visits or keeping on top of clean clothes and meals and work so that we have money.

I have never been so tired, so worried. Those weeks went on forever.

It has been one of the hardest times of my life and I am so sorry for every way it has affected you. More than I can even count, but this is why I had to get it all out.

Because in all of this, little one, you have been my rock. You shouldn’t need to be that at just 3 years old and for that, I am sorry. But I need you to know, I could not have faced any of it without you, much less survived it all. I genuinely think had I been on my own, your lightweight mother would have been in the pub every night, drinking wine to soothe her soul to sleep.

But you have been the motivation I needed. In all this time, when you must have been so confused and worried, you have never asked too much of me.

When you have seen me cry, you have wrapped your little arms tight around my neck and said: “Don’t cry Mummy. No more tears. I love you so much. Daddy will be better soon.”

You have shown empathy beyond your years as I have cradled you and let your warmth and love fill me up.

And if my tears still have not dried, you have wiped them away and hugged me again, as tight as you can squeeze, because you know squeezes make me happy.

You have become more independent. You will get yourself a yoghurt from the fridge, or ask to put the cheese inside your own sandwich. You’ve used your potty training step to climb safely in and out the bath so I son’t have to lift you and you have bravely shouted “Tangles!” when I brush your hair rather than crying through the knots.

You have blown your Daddy kisses every night to his hospital bed and inquisitively asked to see his healing “owwies” regularly so you know where to be gentle. You give the gentlest hugs and kisses and always say “I will not hurt you Daddy.”

It has been so hard. But as ever, you have taken everything in your stride. I feel horrifically guilty, because I haven’t had the time or energy to take you out and do something fun in weeks. You don’t know how important it has been to Mummy to just sit on the floor and do Peppa Pig puzzles with you, or watch you fall in love with the Aristocats for the millionth time from under our “snuggles” blanket. I’m sorry I haven’t been able to give you more when you deserve the world.

Daddy came home this week and I was so relieved to have him back with us, so that the house didn’t have to feel so empty and so quiet, that I stupidly forgot that he is not recovered yet, that there is still a lot for you and me to do.

You are a wonderful little nurse, diligently helping Daddy count out his medication, or taking your Paw Patrol pups to his bed so you can play together. This is clearly the thing that you have missed the most and your Daddy strives to feel better every day so he can make you smile. THe first thing you did when Daddy came home was climb into bed beside him with the Thomas the Tank Engine story book we bough you on your birthday, which you have read to Mummy every night since Daddy has been in hospital. My heart was so happy that day, so happy to see you together and you so determined to be gentle, but close.

You got very cross with me the other day when I told you a nurse would be coming to check on Daddy whilst you would be at nursery. You wanted to know exactly how the nurse was going to take care of Daddy’s owwies and clearly felt like this warranted a day off so you could make sure she was doing it right. It made me laugh and I haven’t laughed much, so thank you. But it is important to give you back some routine, you have been through so much, you need your play time.

I know Mummy has not been the most patient of mummies recently and beautiful girl, I am sorry. I try to apologise every time and explain. But i’ve said the word “stressed” now so much, you often don’t need me to explain now. You are such a kind-hearted girl, and you often apologise to me, your head flopped lovingly on my shoulder. I feel pride and sadness in equal measure. Proud because you don’t want me to be sad, sad because you think you’re the cause.

My wonderful Squidge, you are too young to understand a lot, and yet you seem to understand so much. And so, this letter is here for you when you are older, to help you understand that in all the stress and pain and worry and tiredness, all of which you are hopefully too young to remember, you were what pulled me through. My little girl, with her heart of gold, her endless patence and the best squeezes in the world.

Truth be told, on the days you have not been here and I have found myself alone, I have felt lost without you. It has felt like I have lost an arm and I haven’t felt that way since I dropped you off to nursery that first time when you were such a tiny baby at eight months old. I miss you terribly and only make sense of myself in all of this madness when you are back here with me.

We will not be going through all this forever. When Daddy is better, we have lots of plans to spoil you rotten, because you deserve it so very, very much.

Just, thank you. Thank you for being here, for being my wonderful, loving daughter. Thank you for being you.

All my love for you my darlin’.

Mummy xx

Mummy’s medicine

Pain is a huge part of ageing with cerebral palsy. Whilst its omnipresence is unavoidable, the levels of pain I wake up with every day are unpredictable and draining.

The impact on my emotional wellbeing is getting larger every day.

Yesterday I woke up with very painful tension in my neck and shoulders. Movement was too hard and I was reduced to slumping on the sofa.

Kev climbed in behind me and began to massage the tension. I cried out in pain.

When she was younger and Squidge’s saw that, she pushed Kev away, shouting “No Daddy!”

Yesterday however, Squidge saw and heard my pain and climbed into my lap. She wrapped her arms around my neck. “Ohhh!” she sang empathetically.

But I struggled to hold her as Kev continued apply the necessary pressure to my stubborn muscles.

“Oww!” I whimpered, unable to hold it in.

Squidge pressed her hand tenderly to my face, stroking my cheek as she asked: “You OK Mummy?”

My heart swelled as she worked so gently to distract and soothe me. I didn’t want her to think that her daddy was hurting me so encouraged her to climb into Kev’s lap and feel the tension for herself.

She knew what the solid lump was as soon as Kev helped her feel it with her little hands. “Mummy ow!”

“Yes baby. And Daddy is helping take the ow away for Mummy. It is Mummy’s medicine but Mummy is not very brave, so Mummy say ow.”

“Do you want to help Daddy give Mummy her medicine?”

“Yes.” she said, hands poised in the same position as Kev’s and bless her, she started pushing gently on the lumps.

Kev’s pressure increased, needing to use his elbows. So Squidge climbed down.

“Ow!” I cried out loudly.

But Squidge frowned, telling me sternly: “No Mummy. No ow. Mummy’s medicine not ow.”

We laughed together. Our wonderful girl had listened so well. She knows that medicines exist to make us better. Therefore, we have already taught her it is useless to give into pain.

I like that. Our parenting means thst she already knows that pain is there to be pushed through.

We’re not going to be defeated. Mummy must take her medicine.

My little cheerleader

It feels so strange to say it, but this last week or so, I have been on top of the world. Tired, but accomplished and oh so proud.

Knowing that I struggle and knowing that I don’t want to hide forever, I have taught Squidgelet to say 2 phrases on demand:

“Take your time Mummy’

&

“Come on Mummy, you can do it!”

I love so much that she’s so willing to support me in this way because, whilst I confess I am easily overwhelmed, she remains the reason I do everything and her words calm and focus me so much.

We are home alone today and I was determined not to waste it slobbed out in front of Youtube. Despite how much the thought scared me, we got in the car and I drove. Somewhere new. And when I pulled perfectly into the space, Squidge declared: “Mummy did it!” I was so proud.

Today, for the first time ever, I took Squidgelet swimming on my own. She’s two-and-a-half now, with such amazing communication and empathy for her mummy. I have always been too scared, terrified I might fall.

But she listened to my every instruction, always looking back as she held my hand to make sure our small and steady steps on the slippery surface were keeping pace.

She splashed, she jumped, she kicked her powerful little legs and swam all on her own. It was almost as though, with her buoyancy vest on, she didn’t need me. But better than that, she wanted me there.

I struggle to pull myself up onto the side of the pool, but my beautiful girl pulled me the rest of the way by pulling my shoulders with all her might, so determined was she to push me in again.

I’ve never had so much fun!

I dreaded getting dressed again but kept my voice calm and we talked through every step together. I even managed to coax a hesitant Squidge into the showers. I have learnt everything is a matter of making time for it. No need to get annoyed. No rush.

And here is our #successselfie

My awesome little sidekick and me, all dressed.

I had some shopping to get so decided on lunch in Morrison’s 2 minutes away. Parked perfectly there too.

Squidge, very well rehydrated after swimming had an accident as I sat her in the trolley. Potty training is going really well so we’re at the stage of pants rather than nappies and we’re just starting to have dry days.

Related to the cerebral palsy I believe, I had bladder incontinence issues well into my teens that was resolved by medication in the end. I have never forgotten the shame or lengths I would go to to conceal the problem so I wouldn’t have to miss anything fun. I fully believe Squidge has the same excitable logic and I absolutely refuse to let her feel one iota of the shame I did. We carry 10 changes of clothes and handle everything with a “No worries.”

We got her changed and enjoyed lunch together

Pretty much as soon as this orange juice was consumed in one slurp, there was another accident. She waddled back to the toilets, but I praised her highly, remembering too well how uncomfortable it is to walk with soaked legs.

Quick wardrobe change and Squidge was back in the trolley, diligently ensuring all our purchases were well placed.

I adore her and didn’t care a jot when she admitted to “Poo!” as we were at the checkout. It’s much better to see the hilarity in heading back to the toilets for the third time in 2 hours and wondering how I hadn’t been questioned for shoplifting.

The freedom that my determination to show Squidge that there’s “No worries!” is immeasurable. It, and she, are doing me the world of good right now.

Mummy did it, Squidge!

I am too important

I fell over in the supermarket last week. It was not my fault. This I know – displays should not obstruct aisles to the point of injury.

And yet, as I sat on the floor recovering, flanked by 2 lovely strangers who stayed to check I could get up safely, familiar feelings crept in.

Embarrassment. Vulnerability. Shame.

The dull ache of whiplash and resultant stiff muscles ruled my weekend. I cried all weekend, so overwhelmed by misery.

I hate to feel useless. But I feel it more and more. My confidence, ever fragile, is destroyed by every fall. I am going out less and less. I can feel the independence I wrangled for creeping away from me, each of us withdrawing into ourselves. We’re separate again now, you see.

That’s not OK. I grieve every day. I was never allowed to recognise that process when I was younger. I was supposed to be grateful that I had legs that worked and that wasn’t worse. I have been haunted by “it could have been worse”.

I don’t try and deny that grief anymore. I think that by accepting it and letting myself say with the finesse of a child that it is unfair, I am saying it cannot overwhelm me.

Sometimes it still does, this weekend being a prime example. So overrun with emotions – shame and hatred among them – I was desperate to lash out at the body that fails me and punishes me in doing so. Rationally I knew it would achieve nothing, but I was so overrun with hatred for the body I can never turn away from or escape.

It gets so very lonely, being on the fringe of so many parts of society. I can be disabled… but I can walk; I can be a mum… but I walk funny. I’ve never been able to fit anyone’s view. And it has broken me. All I have ever wanted to do is fit.

But I will not. Denying my reality is causing me so much pain. I already have so much pain. I do not apologise when I say I cannot live like this anymore.

I cannot live with I can’t. All that makes me feel is that I can’t be society’s perception of what I ought to be. But I am learning that other people cannot validate what they haven’t come to understand.

I don’t want to waste away here, resenting the safe haven of my home. That is not enough for me. But I do need to feel safe. And so I have finally decided to invest in a walking aid. The thought even as I write that makes me shudder with the embarrassment teenage me felt so acutely when I rejected the option.

But it cannot serve my pride in this way any longer. If I stop living, Squidge misses out too and even if I have to accept a decline so young, I will never accept its effects on my darling girl.

So I’m going to safeguard my independence however I can and teach Squidge that all expressions of emotion are OK, are healthy if they are being processed.

I fully expect that one day she may not want to be seen with her mum and a walker and that’s OK. I have to deal with the disability whatever, so there will be nothing I can’t deal with in her honesty.

But for now, I choose to let this decision empower me. After all, if it helps me carry on, then that’s all that matters. A wonderful friend said to me today “It is not for all the time. Often, it is just a visual reference to inform others you need more time.” Disability is not the either/or scenario I have always imagined. We can work with it. I hope. It feels positive to feel even that.

I am making a choice. I am important. I will shout for what I need. I will teach my girl to shout too. We will muddle through. As Squidge would say (to)”getha”

It Doesn’t Have to be a Nightmare

So I thought that first fall was my worst nightmare come true. I never counted on feeling worse than that, even though I know it was unavoidable that it would happen again.

On Thursday night, Kev went for a run whilst I agreed to bath Squidge alone. I wrapped her in her towel and lifted her into my arms, doing well so far. I tried to pick my steps back into the lounge carefully, she is precious cargo after all. But I kicked one of her boots that I’d stupidly left on the floor and we keeled over together. I wanted to throw her away from me, but the only direction she could land in the split second that we fell together was towards our glass coffee table and I just couldn’t make myself let her go. So in that instant decision, I had no choice but to land on her. I moved off as quickly as I could, but understandably she cried.

The guilt coursed through me and I cried too, checking her over again and again, even when she’d stopped crying as soon as I’d adminstered ‘magic kisses’ to where she said her arm hurt. But oh, I felt like a monster, a careless monster. After all, I should have known to pack her shoes away before undertaking bath time by myself. I called Kev in an instinctive panic and he came home as quickly as he could. The rest of the evening passed just as normal, though I’ll admit I did have a glass of wine for medicinal purposes!

The next day, playing on the floor with Squidge, she playfully pushed me back on the rug, wanting to climb and lie on me and play. That’s usually a good way for us to play together, because there’s nowhere else to go if you’re already on the floor, it’s pretty safe. But this time, I fell back on her big toy drum with quite some force and I cried out in pain when it dug into the tense muscles of my shoulder.

Squidge stopped dead, frowning in concern and confusion as Kev moved to help me get up.

“Mummy ow.” I explained when I was sat down safely.

“Mummy ow the drum.” she replied.

About half an hour later, she threw herself down on the floor, striking her back on the drum in the same fashion I did, looking over at me as she shouted: “Immy ow!”

In that second, I was heartbroken, realising she was imitating my fall, repeating my pain as if it was a normal aspect of the life we live together. In the next second, I was impressed that she had understood the whole incident. After all, imitative play is how children develop an understanding of their world and whether I’m comfortable with it or not, falls and pain are a regular and undeniable part of our life.

I got down on the floor and said gently: “Oh darlin’, Immy doesn’t have to ow. Mummy ow cos Mummy fell over.”

“Immy and Mummy fell over.”

Then I realised she was connecting the two incidents, as if it was she thought she had to fall because I did, because we’d fallen together the previous night. Again, heartbreaking. After all, I am her mum. I am alive to be her greatest protector and yet from my arms, she had felt pain, however fleetingly. I felt so guilty, although given how much I worried about this exact incident when she was a tiny wriggly newborn, I suppose there was a need to be proud that it had taken me over 2 years to get to the dreaded moment.

But still, it showed how clued in she is. That made me very proud too. She shows such a great level of understanding and empathy.

“We did fall over darlin’, but only because Mummy has tired legs. Immy has clever legs, you don’t need to fall.”

I showed her where on my body I had hurt myself on the drum, let her feel the tight tenderness in my shoulder.

“I don’t want you to ow like Mummy, when you have clever legs!”

“Clever legs!”

“And what does Mummy have?”

“Tired legs.”

I think this is the start of explaining Mummy’s differences. In the simplest terms I can. And so far, my beautiful Squidge’s head and heart are keeping up. I really hope this won’t be so bad after all.

Please, Ask Me What It’s Like to Be Me

This is written from a place of emotion. CBT tells me that I shouldn’t always listen to my emotional voice. It’s loud and often angry. Mental equilibrium is achieved by letting the rational voice in, to quieten the emotional voice and calm the mind.

But, what I have realised is, my mind cannot be calmed if it cannot believe it is in charge of my body. It doesn’t. I don’t. So, this comes from a place of struggling, of raw pain. Of wishing there could be just a little more understanding.

I offered some insight into my life to a hard-at-work author today, who wants to portray someone, like me, with mild CP in his book. I haven’t seen many such characters (though maybe that’s on me to widen my reading, I get that). But talking to him, telling him my truth was strangely cathartic. I was glad I did it.

See, a lot of my historic experiences have shown me that society believes (and the media often expects) that one disabled person can speak for us all. For me, that figurehead seems to be Tanni Grey Thompson. A very accomplished woman. I will not insult either of us by calling her inspiring. To me, she is just a woman living her life as best she can. After all, that’s all any of us can be right? But to the media, she is the person to (literally!) roll out to explain any disabled related issue to the rest of us. I got sick of the sight of her on TV to be honest and the poor woman has done nothing wrong. But the point is, she does not speak for me, even on the occassions when our opinions align. For starters, we have very different conditions. Tanni has spina bifida. I do not. She uses a wheelchair. I do not. Not all the same see?

I cannot speak to the life experiences of every disabled person, or even every person with the exact same condition as me (spastic diplegia cerebral palsy, in case you wondered). Cerebral palsy has many types, on many spectrums and effects each life differently.

I spent my teenage years, my physically better years pretending it wasn’t there. I’d cry everytime I caught sight of my scissor pattern staggering in shop windows, because that wasn’t the person I was in my mind’s eye. To me, so long as I cou;dn’t see it, I was the same as everybody else.

Except, now, I know this is the wrong approach. The physical toll has worsened. I live in a body worn to an age about 20 years above my documented age. Now, I live in fear of aging. I will not die any sooner as a result of my condition. But at 60 years old, I will likely feel as most people do physically towards the end of their lives. I will be facing, statistically, another 15-20 years, a gift I’m sure. Except, what does 20 years past the end of life feel like? No-one can know can they? I am terrified.

And that’s not what people want to hear. People want to tell me I’m strong and brave and quite frankly, I’m sick of it. Those are token words, they are not what I feel, not by a long shot. I’m not living this life because I’m strong or brave, or (shudder!) an inspiration. I am living this life because I have a family and dreams to live for. Because to not live this life takes away the pride I feel at belonging to them all. I live this life simply because there are people too important to not be here to love and enjoy.

I suppose the argument I have with myself, rightly or wrongly, is that people hide in these platitudes because they cannot know what it is like to be me. I get that. But please, please don’t be afraid to ask. If I’m having a good day, I’ll say it is what it is, that my husband, my daughter are all the reason I need to be OK with being me. If I’m having a bad day, I will probably cry. I will tell you I’m sick of being constantly sore and I’m too tired to do this anymore.

I realise how awkward it might make you feel. No-one really knows how to fix another do they? And I know I cannot be fixed. I long for it and I will not apologise for it. But I know in my heart that it is not a realistic expectation and am moving to take positive steps in self-acceptance, because I feel this is something I really need in my life when the prospect of living a long life has the power to frighten me so much. I have a lot to live for, but that doesn’t make the act of living any less hard.

So, if I’m in tears, if I can’t do this anymore, please don’t shy away. These limitations can be incredibly lonely. I don’t expect the world to fix me. I just need someone to ask, to wear an empathetic/sympathetic face. You don’t need to tell me I do “so well”. I need you to recognise that this is hard, to tell me that the constant struggles are rubbish and unfair. Everyone understands how hard life can be? How unfair?

Please don’t be afraid to ask. To hear. I will always fight on another day. I have things to fight for.

But sometimes, I just need someone to join me in a beaten heap on the floor, someone to help me get ready for the fight again.