I really needed that

This is the walker. Squidge loves it but there are versions of me that despise the fact I need to use it at all.

Today was not a day when that fight needed to matter. I had slept horribly on my shoulder and every movement hurt. Today I needed its help.

I dropped Squidge off at playgroup and was already in tears from the pain. I felt so lost and overwhelmed.

And then, walking through town, an elderly couple approached me, joking about not texting in charge of a vehicle.

The lady asked me outright what I needed it for, curious, not accusatory. It felt strange. But her kindness allowed me to a bit more honest.

“My balance is shot.”

This lovely stranger squeezed my hand and said “Good for you. You’re doing the right thing then.”

I really needed to hear that. For once, there was no judgement, no eyeing me up as a fraud because you can’t see my pain.

I went on to my massage. The therapist was so kind and understanding. She knew of cerebral palsy, was unsurprised when I mentioned my muscle tension, or the need to have a bit longer to get undressed. She even offered to help. And I didn’t allow myself to feel patronised. I felt supported.

She worked tirelessly on my muscles and tension. I felt the pain subside, the muscles loosen. By the time I collected Squidge from playgroup I felt human enough to agree to a play in the park.

After the emotional turmoil of constant pain and stress these last few weeks, it was nothing short of miraculous. I’m allowed to be important too. I think I really needed to be told that today.

Facing Fears

The pain I have been in and how useless it has made me feel these last couple of weeks came to a head on Friday night. When Kev arrived home at 6pm to bathe Squidge and put her to bed, I couldn’t speak, sinking into my sadness.

As Squidge requested that “Daddy read” her bedtime story, I ran a hot, hot bath hoping my muscles might relax. I climbed in and burst into tears.

I fell into an exhausted sleep at some point that evening but even then… the tears and the sadness didn’t stop. In truth, I think I cried for 18 hours straight.

I think I was grieving. Grieving for the mum I wasn’t capable of being, for the support and experiences my beautiful girl couldn’t have because of me.

Having no choice but to accept that I will always be sore. Maybe not quite this much, but always some. That the levels of pain will always have some level of control on what I am able to do. And that didn’t seem like much at all.

We had a wedding reception to go to. But I couldn’t face it. Told Kev I couldn’t face the crowds, the small talk, the exhaustion and feeling like an eternal party pooper.

And Kev was as understanding as he could possibly be and told me that was fine. Said Squidge should go to his parents as planned and I should take care of me. But I just cried harder, I felt lost. If I wasn’t going to go, then I wanted to spend the weekend giving my time and energy to our little girl because the pain had let me fail her.

But Kev was right when he said I had no energy left to give, that to try when I was running on empty would be to everyone’s detriment. And I felt awful. Because more choices were being taken from me, because I couldn’t be the mum I so want to be.

Feeling like that though, how on earth was I supposed to go and have a nice, relaxing day to myself? When, not only would I be letting my daughter down, but also friends who were expecting me to celebrate their most special day with them? The prospect felt hollow and oh so lonely. I knew that if I was left alone, the horrible grieving tears had no chance of stopping. I didn’t know who to reach out to, because who can understand all the facets of this life?

The lessons of my Cognitive Behavioural Therapy course were also ringing loudly in my ears.

Face. Your. Fears.

Avoidance only offers temporary relief.

So, I took baby steps. My breathing wasn’t quite regular even when I got in the car with Kev, London bound. I didn’t know at that point whether I could talk myself into going to the reception. But it didn’t matter. I didn’t have to be alone.

And I went. I went into a room in a dress that made me feel pretty, in shoes that didn’t make me wince (Calla are literal lifesavers… I never thought shoes could make me happy) and I enjoyed the small talk, I enjoyed seeing so many happy people in one room. There was always a glass of Prosecco in my hand and it took hours of propping up the bar before my feet started to ache. I tried desperately not to pay attention to the time, to not bring myself down by feeling like a let down.

As it was, I admitted defeat just before 10pm – a solid effort for me. Kev was equally triumphant on my behalf and came back to the hotel with me without a word of complaint. I was a warm and happy drunk and felt accomplished with it.

I’d listened to the CBT advice and accomplished something for me, faced my fear of social situations, feeling like I couldn’t fit in a roomful of energetic happy people.

And I went to bed and slept for a good long time.

Exactly what I needed. Well done me.