It’s A Small World After All

The world is a strange place right now. In the grip of a global pandemic that has the potential to threaten all of our lives.

The best advice is to self isolate, protect yourself, protect those you love and by virtue of sensible action, protect vulnerable strangers. To say a grateful prayer for the nurses, doctors and key workers the world over working with all of their heart and soul to keep us well, keep us safe and help us find a way out to the other side.

To not be one of the idiots clearing supermarket shelves, or taking your entire family out for a day trip in the aisles.

We keep hearing the phrase unprecendented times and though it might be starting to grate, it couldn’t be more true. The world has never faced something of this scale. We’ve survived World Wars, people have lived through nuclear war and terrorist attacks. And yet, we don’t seem to be grasping the sheer importance of staying home. Even in a week when Disney+ was launched, we seem determined to get out and endanger life, simply because we’re being told not to. We cannot be surprised a lockdown has been forced upon us and honestly, the stupidity and selfishness of people at large is starting to scare me more than the virus itself.

My family & I are personally 2 weeks into a suggested 12 week shielding isolation, because both my pregnancy and cerebral palsy apparently place me at a higher risk, so the three of us have bunkered down, basically for the sake of our two children. I don’t think the grade of my cerebral palsy puts me at increased risk because I am fortunate not to have any of the common secondary conditions, like respiratory issues, but we absolutely would rather be safe than sorry.

So there’s no more nursery for Squidge, no playgroups, no gym, no trips to the park. Kev & I are working from home and Netflix & Paw Patrol are babysitting a lot. I feel a lot of guilt, but it’s almost comforting to know we’re not the only ones facing this. I do feel sorry for Squidge most of all, the lack of routine is not fair to her. I will be glad to get that back.

But, I am learning a lot.

There’s not been enough work to work my full days so the childcare has in the most part fallen to me. Kev comes down to play with Squidge and share meals as often as he can. It is so nice to be able to have breakfast together every day and it is certainly something I will want to maintain for our weekends.

It has been so lovely to sit with Squidge and play games, to draw rainbows for the windows, to count all the Stay Safe rainbows out in the community on our daily walks.

I am home a lot anyway given that I worked from home before all this to maintain my health and my world already existed within a small radius of our town, so that I could feel confident and independent. It may not be everyone’s choice when the world is at a normal capacity, but it works for me. Now that the world has been forced to slow down for the greater good, I guess they’re seeing more what my world is like. I mean, I can’t say that everyone appears to be enjoying it, but it’s more of a reality now.

Suddenly, I don’t need to feel so guilty for living in my small world. The whole world is suddenly small. My own personal universe is required to exist within the walls of my home, extending on sunny days out to our backyard, all for the good of ourselves and others.

It’s kinda nice not being able to be frivolous. I mean, I try to be savvy anyway, but there’s nowhere to go right now! I’m not going to lie, I did get a wholesale box of chocolate delivered, so please think of me when I go in for gestastional diabetes test in a few months! It’s nice to have more money in my pocket, so I’m overpaying our mortgage a little more. Like most people, we’re probably being forced to spend more money on our groceries, but that’s pretty much all, but suddenly you learn all the things you already have, the things you can make do without. It no longer makes a difference if I get my hair done every 3 months. In fact, I’m letting it grow out during the isolation so that there’s less work to do when the world goes back to normal. I’m about to be a mum to 2 children, possibly whilst still under all the necessary restrictions of this panemic. My roots are going to be the last damn thing I care about.

Part of me hope that a lot of people out there are reassessing what’s important. This isn’t a lecture, I’m a consumer like the rest of us, but in a time when it’s getting harder by the day to name the positives, it’s nice to know the environment is being given some kind of breather whilst we’re forced to be at home. My home is important, because it is my own and I am lucky to have it. So, whilst it’s possible, the mortgage is important. My nice fluffy blankets are important. My Headspace subscription is important. Clearing the house out ready for the baby is important.

Very few things outside of my little world (besides extended family and the restoration of Squidge’s routine) will continue to be important when some level of sanity and calm is restored in the world. That in itself feels very freeing.

I am almost 20 weeks pregnant now. In some ways, that’s a relief, in other ways it makes me sad. When I dreamt of having a second, I wanted to prioritise myself, my health and enjoy a calm pregnancy. In fact, two of the most pivotal people in my family have had extended hospital stays and now the whole world is at risk from a virus I have to hide from for the sake of them all.

Next week, I will be forced to attend my scan alone, because partners are not permitted to minimise the risk of coronavirus spread and even then, Kev would not be able to attend because we have no support network since Kev’s parents went into isolation for their own health at the same time as us, hence there will be no-one to care for Squidge. There is nothing to be done, but we are both gutted. We wanted to discover our baby’s gender together. Now, however, if it can be determined, I will find out before the father and sister of the baby, the two most important people they will ever know. I have arranged gender reveal surprises for them, but out of necessity rather than anything, because I really dislike the conceit surrounding the tradition of reveals. But I don’t expect anyone to care about the news other than Baby’s family.

My hips are starting to ache a little more and I feel a bit more vulnerable when moving, but I keep remembering the struggle of carrying Squidge and I am thankful most days that my physical self has withstood this pregnancy, especially with all the emotional challenges we have faced instead. I fully intend to single-handedly keep both my physiotherapist and massage therapist in business when my isolation is able to end, because I miss them terribly, as do all my muscles!

I sincerely hope that everyone in a similar position to me is prioritising themselves, taking care of themselves and remembering to breathe. I forget this often and as stress build, my God can I feel it translate in my body. This is an entirely new scenario for us all to live amongst, but remember that that’s true for us all. That means you’re not alone. Keep busy, but take things slow. Much like I wanted my stay-at-home mum lufe to be, there is no sense of time anymore, there is literally no rush. Right now, all we have is time. Use it to look after yourself and make yourself your priority. If we’re not looking after ourselves, we’ll not be able to do our best for others, those who probably need us more than ever whilst the world is on its head.

So let’s go for the little things, the simple pleasures and let the rest fall away. The world will speed up again, it will get big again. Let’s take some comfort in the peace of this small world. It cannot last forever.

Stay safe.

Love Letter to my Little One vol. 3

Oh beautiful girl,

We are going through so much that I forget you are just 3 years old. Times have been tough for you & I, the world has barely stopped for 2 months now and shows no signs of slowing down. Nanny was unexpectedly in hospital and she and Granddad are such a huge part of helping us help you become the amazing young lady you are. It was hard. It was scary. We missed her lots. But Nanny came home for Christmas, we all took a little breath and hoped that her recovery would be kind and that 2020 would allow us to get back to normal.

But the world had other ideas and I’m so sorry for all that has meant for you Squidge. Your daddy, never ill a day in his life it seems, ended up in hospital for 3 long weeks like Nanny and I don’t think the shock has left us yet.

I’ve never had to be without your daddy, not in our 10 years together. I’ve never had to take care of you by myself. I’ve never had to worry about Daddy being poorly, or hospital visits or keeping on top of clean clothes and meals and work so that we have money.

I have never been so tired, so worried. Those weeks went on forever.

It has been one of the hardest times of my life and I am so sorry for every way it has affected you. More than I can even count, but this is why I had to get it all out.

Because in all of this, little one, you have been my rock. You shouldn’t need to be that at just 3 years old and for that, I am sorry. But I need you to know, I could not have faced any of it without you, much less survived it all. I genuinely think had I been on my own, your lightweight mother would have been in the pub every night, drinking wine to soothe her soul to sleep.

But you have been the motivation I needed. In all this time, when you must have been so confused and worried, you have never asked too much of me.

When you have seen me cry, you have wrapped your little arms tight around my neck and said: “Don’t cry Mummy. No more tears. I love you so much. Daddy will be better soon.”

You have shown empathy beyond your years as I have cradled you and let your warmth and love fill me up.

And if my tears still have not dried, you have wiped them away and hugged me again, as tight as you can squeeze, because you know squeezes make me happy.

You have become more independent. You will get yourself a yoghurt from the fridge, or ask to put the cheese inside your own sandwich. You’ve used your potty training step to climb safely in and out the bath so I son’t have to lift you and you have bravely shouted “Tangles!” when I brush your hair rather than crying through the knots.

You have blown your Daddy kisses every night to his hospital bed and inquisitively asked to see his healing “owwies” regularly so you know where to be gentle. You give the gentlest hugs and kisses and always say “I will not hurt you Daddy.”

It has been so hard. But as ever, you have taken everything in your stride. I feel horrifically guilty, because I haven’t had the time or energy to take you out and do something fun in weeks. You don’t know how important it has been to Mummy to just sit on the floor and do Peppa Pig puzzles with you, or watch you fall in love with the Aristocats for the millionth time from under our “snuggles” blanket. I’m sorry I haven’t been able to give you more when you deserve the world.

Daddy came home this week and I was so relieved to have him back with us, so that the house didn’t have to feel so empty and so quiet, that I stupidly forgot that he is not recovered yet, that there is still a lot for you and me to do.

You are a wonderful little nurse, diligently helping Daddy count out his medication, or taking your Paw Patrol pups to his bed so you can play together. This is clearly the thing that you have missed the most and your Daddy strives to feel better every day so he can make you smile. THe first thing you did when Daddy came home was climb into bed beside him with the Thomas the Tank Engine story book we bough you on your birthday, which you have read to Mummy every night since Daddy has been in hospital. My heart was so happy that day, so happy to see you together and you so determined to be gentle, but close.

You got very cross with me the other day when I told you a nurse would be coming to check on Daddy whilst you would be at nursery. You wanted to know exactly how the nurse was going to take care of Daddy’s owwies and clearly felt like this warranted a day off so you could make sure she was doing it right. It made me laugh and I haven’t laughed much, so thank you. But it is important to give you back some routine, you have been through so much, you need your play time.

I know Mummy has not been the most patient of mummies recently and beautiful girl, I am sorry. I try to apologise every time and explain. But i’ve said the word “stressed” now so much, you often don’t need me to explain now. You are such a kind-hearted girl, and you often apologise to me, your head flopped lovingly on my shoulder. I feel pride and sadness in equal measure. Proud because you don’t want me to be sad, sad because you think you’re the cause.

My wonderful Squidge, you are too young to understand a lot, and yet you seem to understand so much. And so, this letter is here for you when you are older, to help you understand that in all the stress and pain and worry and tiredness, all of which you are hopefully too young to remember, you were what pulled me through. My little girl, with her heart of gold, her endless patence and the best squeezes in the world.

Truth be told, on the days you have not been here and I have found myself alone, I have felt lost without you. It has felt like I have lost an arm and I haven’t felt that way since I dropped you off to nursery that first time when you were such a tiny baby at eight months old. I miss you terribly and only make sense of myself in all of this madness when you are back here with me.

We will not be going through all this forever. When Daddy is better, we have lots of plans to spoil you rotten, because you deserve it so very, very much.

Just, thank you. Thank you for being here, for being my wonderful, loving daughter. Thank you for being you.

All my love for you my darlin’.

Mummy xx

My best friend

The loneliness of this life is real baby girl. I know a lot of mums feel this way, like they lose their identity a bit with their tiny human needing them more than anyone before.

Pause it there. It is so crucially important to me that you always know that I do not feel this way because I am a mum. Being your mum, Squidgelet, has been a transformation for me. You are my anchor, the sense of purpose I didn’t know I was missing before I met you.

My sense of identity has been eroded by CP. Fatigue is too fluffy a term for it. It just makes me think of damsels in distress, fanning their brow dramatically til the cavlry rocks up

You’re my cavalry Squidge.

When I was glancing wistfully at the well groomed mums at playgroup, wishing they’d be my friends, like I might be one of them (that is, capable of drinking gin AND holding a conversation circa 8pm) you snapped me out of it by wanting to build castles.

I feel so guilty. Like, all the time. It’s as though no matter what, I’ll never feel I’m good enough for you because I’m always so depleted.

This morning was a shouty one. God knows what next door thought of me as I tried to push you out into the rain. You were crying then but I just wanted to get to the doctors on time.

You walked so well. No complaints, so road aware, so helpful. I have so much love for you Squidgelet and this morning I didn’t show it. I’m sorry.

We’ve played all day. Soft play, gymnastics and even a sneaky chocolate biscuit in between for being such a rockstar – right down to nagging Mummy like your Granny used to, telling me to stand up straight to save my back ache.

I love so much chatting away to you as we make our inevitable trip to Morrison’s so you can push a little trolley. There are always so many people in the supermarket and I don’t need anyone but you. You make me laugh as we sing questions to each other or you burst out in a new rendition of Big Girls Don’t Cry. I played you Frankie Valli when you were in my tummy and I love so much that one of my loves stuck with you.

I am so proud that even at a time of your life when you’re wrangling with your own emotions, you always remember to look after me – holding my hand or picking up your toys so I don’t fall.

Being able to spend any time with you feeds my soul and brings me happiness I cannot put into words. It helps me feel right in a world where I just feel so overwhelmed and out of place. You give me that, just by existing. You amaze me.

Life is tough for Mummy right now which means it’s hard on you and Daddy too.

But more and more, I realise now, it doesn’t matter. Because whatever comes at us, you’ve already told me… “We’ll do it together”.

And that, darling girl, is truly all I need. Thank you.

It Doesn’t Have to be a Nightmare

So I thought that first fall was my worst nightmare come true. I never counted on feeling worse than that, even though I know it was unavoidable that it would happen again.

On Thursday night, Kev went for a run whilst I agreed to bath Squidge alone. I wrapped her in her towel and lifted her into my arms, doing well so far. I tried to pick my steps back into the lounge carefully, she is precious cargo after all. But I kicked one of her boots that I’d stupidly left on the floor and we keeled over together. I wanted to throw her away from me, but the only direction she could land in the split second that we fell together was towards our glass coffee table and I just couldn’t make myself let her go. So in that instant decision, I had no choice but to land on her. I moved off as quickly as I could, but understandably she cried.

The guilt coursed through me and I cried too, checking her over again and again, even when she’d stopped crying as soon as I’d adminstered ‘magic kisses’ to where she said her arm hurt. But oh, I felt like a monster, a careless monster. After all, I should have known to pack her shoes away before undertaking bath time by myself. I called Kev in an instinctive panic and he came home as quickly as he could. The rest of the evening passed just as normal, though I’ll admit I did have a glass of wine for medicinal purposes!

The next day, playing on the floor with Squidge, she playfully pushed me back on the rug, wanting to climb and lie on me and play. That’s usually a good way for us to play together, because there’s nowhere else to go if you’re already on the floor, it’s pretty safe. But this time, I fell back on her big toy drum with quite some force and I cried out in pain when it dug into the tense muscles of my shoulder.

Squidge stopped dead, frowning in concern and confusion as Kev moved to help me get up.

“Mummy ow.” I explained when I was sat down safely.

“Mummy ow the drum.” she replied.

About half an hour later, she threw herself down on the floor, striking her back on the drum in the same fashion I did, looking over at me as she shouted: “Immy ow!”

In that second, I was heartbroken, realising she was imitating my fall, repeating my pain as if it was a normal aspect of the life we live together. In the next second, I was impressed that she had understood the whole incident. After all, imitative play is how children develop an understanding of their world and whether I’m comfortable with it or not, falls and pain are a regular and undeniable part of our life.

I got down on the floor and said gently: “Oh darlin’, Immy doesn’t have to ow. Mummy ow cos Mummy fell over.”

“Immy and Mummy fell over.”

Then I realised she was connecting the two incidents, as if it was she thought she had to fall because I did, because we’d fallen together the previous night. Again, heartbreaking. After all, I am her mum. I am alive to be her greatest protector and yet from my arms, she had felt pain, however fleetingly. I felt so guilty, although given how much I worried about this exact incident when she was a tiny wriggly newborn, I suppose there was a need to be proud that it had taken me over 2 years to get to the dreaded moment.

But still, it showed how clued in she is. That made me very proud too. She shows such a great level of understanding and empathy.

“We did fall over darlin’, but only because Mummy has tired legs. Immy has clever legs, you don’t need to fall.”

I showed her where on my body I had hurt myself on the drum, let her feel the tight tenderness in my shoulder.

“I don’t want you to ow like Mummy, when you have clever legs!”

“Clever legs!”

“And what does Mummy have?”

“Tired legs.”

I think this is the start of explaining Mummy’s differences. In the simplest terms I can. And so far, my beautiful Squidge’s head and heart are keeping up. I really hope this won’t be so bad after all.

“Mummy, I’m alright!”

This is Freddie. Freddie is the most loved Fox there ever was.

Freddie came into Squidge’s life when she was just a few weeks old, my own best friend introducing my baby girl to her own best friend. I love that. I love that Squidge loves someone else so much.

He comes with her everywhere at the moment. He came with us to the playground opposite our house. She pushed him lovingly back and forth on the swing until, inevitably “Freddie glide!” (Slide, of course!)

Squidge has always been so confident physically, very rarely is she willing to accept help. And I love that confidence, I want her to have it always.

But because she was so determined that beloved Freddie should enjoy the experience too and she would not let him go, she lost her previously confident footing on the suspended stepping stones.

I know every parent experiences the horror of slow motion. I saw her fall before she did and cursed my body for not reacting in time as she sobbed in shock.

I bundled her into my arms and checked her over, horror and tears coarsing through me. I had never seen her actually hurt herself before. I called Kev instinctively as I soothed her, convinced we’d be going to A&E.

As it rang, I asked Squidge where she hurt. She’d fallen forwards about three feet and I was terrified she’d say “head” or worse, nothing at all because I’d allowed her to be so damaged she couldn’t remember.

“Chiiiiin!” She wailed. I personally have split my own chin open twice so was terrified to look where she pointed. But there wasn’t so much as a graze. The sobbing subsided (from Squidge at least!) and Kev, thank God, was calm.

“I can’t even hear her crying.”

“She is!” I insisted as she wriggled out of my arms.

“What’s she doing right now?”

As I remained a tearful, guilty wreck on the floor, I dared to look up. And not only had our beautiful, brave, confident girl climbed back up onto the slide; when she saw me looking, she called out reassuringly “Mummy, I’m alright.”

And so Squidge and Freddie played on until she could be tempted away with an offer of tea and an episode of “Money” (aka Tipping Point) and I was amazed and humbled by the utter resilience in someone so small.

The guilt made my stomach wrench as my baby cried but that baby, she consoled me. Never have I been so reassured of the good job I am doing as a parent.

Mummy sees you’re alright Squidge. I think you’ve got this, baby one.

My Worst Nightmare

Yesterday, I lived my worst nightmare.

I fell over in the road holding onto my little girl’s hand.

I always have this moment where I know I’m about to fall, so try and prepare my body for the impact. I remember clinging to Squidge’s little hand and praying to God she didn’t fall too. I hit the road with a thump – it still really hurts to sit down – and heard this panicked shriek of “Mummy!”

I immediately folded my body around my little girl, guiding her to the kerb. She’d fallen with me too. I’d struggled too much to keep up with her eager little step and pulled her down. But even in that confusion, she didn’t cry. We’d be walking round the corner to playgroup and were literally one kerb away from the door.

Another of the mums saw me fall and came running over to make sure we were OK. I’d barely even registered that it was me that had fallen, or how much pain I was in. I just folded myself round Squidge, told her we were OK. Because that was what she needed to know. She wasn’t crying from her own pain. The very first thing she did was look back for me – she didn’t even let go of my hand on impact.

My little girl is a star. This was out first fall. I felt so guilty, have always dreaded the first day that this would happen and wondered how she would cope with the realisation that Mummy cannot always keep her safe. But I’m proud to say my instinct was to do just that – and that it seems Squidge’s was the exact same.

Still so full of pride

I am currently full of a lot of mum guilt.

I feel like I am not giving the Squidgelet any time at the moment. I’ve spent my days off either working on my uni essay (submitted 3 weeks ahead of time to compensate for our holiday in 2 weeks) or ill and therefore avoiding her.

And germs. Let’s not forget the germs.

Week before last I had norovirus, so the in-laws came and rescued Squidgelet before I could infect her. I woke the poor love up with my vomiting in the bathroom next to her bedroom at 6am. It’s hard to console the concerned calls of “Mumma? Mummy?!” between retching. I was better in time for my big sister’s wedding and Squidge had a blast, running around, dancing to Baby Shark and eating her bodyweight in cake,

But last week, I had physio, which is miles away, very expensive and therefore cannot be missed. It takes nearly a whole day. I recently changed my days at work with good intentions and then realised my physiotherapist is only available on a day I’ve agreed to work. Now, I only go every 8 weeks (see, expensive!) so my boss is not bothered by an infrequent swap but it does mean a day less with my girl every 8 weeks.

And now, just in time for my very first Friday off with Squidge, I’ve caught someone’s cold. I am an absolute germophobe and am enraged by ill people coming into the office. Work from home you selfish [insert favourite swear word here]. So instead, we’re £45 out of pocket sending Squidge to nursery for the day so I can concentrate on sweating out the lurgy in time for the weekend.

Mum guilt sucks.

I feel terrible about going on holiday even. We’re finally going to Cuba – the honeymoon destination Kev picked out for us 3 years ago that was scuppered by Squidge’s very presence in my belly and the threat of the Zika virus. I am really looking forward to it, as it is to be our last “grown up” holiday before we give in to ten years of Butlins and theme parks. Yes, I’m a terrible mother who’s leaving my baby behind. But I’m being very measured about that of course. Not. I’ve reiterated to another of my big sisters that I want her and her partner to raise Squidge alongside their daughter if the plane crashes out of the sky.

Happy holiday everyone!


Mummy madness aside, today, Facebook memories threw up this perfect little gem from one whole year ago.

I never knew pride like it. She’d been cruising and holding our hands from about 8 or 9 months old, but we were just playing on the bedroom floor and she got up and she just did it, like she was made for it. Her confidence (unlike my immune system it seems) has gone from strength to strength.

Squidge really is flourishing. We have a playground on the opposite side of our road and I’ve been bundling my gorgeous girl up in the big warm, winter coat from last year that she’s grown in to and we’ve been kicking and crunching the autumn leaves, I’ve been listening to her shriek with delight as she runs around shouting “Ready! Steady! Go!” at the top of her little lungs. She is so “‘appy!” (That’s our current favourite Squidge-ism!)

She’s been really getting to grips with her alphabet, throwing her alphabet bricks around the lounge when the mood takes her, or calming handing them to you one by one and more often than not, correctly declaring the letter on it. (My favourite is “Ah-oh-woo!” – W!) She did the whole thing flawlessly the other day – Kev was staggered.

And so, while I sit in a million layers, sniffling in front of the fire and feeling sorry for myself, I can take absolute pride in how my little Squidgelet is coming on in the world. And maybe the guilt can lessen a bit because this one is her own person and she is doing just fine. So it’s OK to take care of me too – I’ll be back crunching leaves in no time!